graphic-2

Reddish Vale Country Park

Blue Tit

All images, copyright, Stockport Nature.Com

Weight, 11g,

Wingspan, 18cm,

Lifespan, 3yrs, 0.379 survive first year,

Diet, Insect and spiders, also fruit and seeds in winter ,

UK breeding, 19 to 42 million pairs.

 

reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit reddish vale country park, blue tit

The Blue tit is spread all around Europe apart from northern parts of Scandinavia. It is also present in north-western parts of Africa.

 

It inhabits wooded areas, parks and gardens, where it finds enough of food supplies. They feed on small invertebrates, seeds, nuts, aphids – that is welcomed particularly by gardeners. They are often found hoping in the trees, and their small size enables them to hang upside down.

They are 12 cm (5 inches) in size. They are rather tiny. Their head is quite small with blue crown, white cheeks and black stripe going through each eye. The chest and belly are yellow, back is greenish-blue and wings are blue with a white stripe going across each wing. The legs are black. All this makes their plumage very vivid. Sexes are alike, however the females are duller.

 

Their nest is usually placed in the tree holes. They have got from 7 to 16 eggs that are white with reddish-brown markings. The young tend to leave the nest even they are unable to fly, which is a huge drawback for them. Because it makes them an easy prey for predators such as cats.

 

The yellowness of a male blue tit's breast indicates how many yellowy-green caterpillars he has eaten, due to the high levels of carotene pigments within his diet. This makes him attractive to females, since he has shown he is the kind of mate who will be good at feeding chicks.

 

Blue Tits feed mostly on insects, especially caterpillars, and seeds. In springtime they feed also on pollen, nectar and sap, and in the autumn on berries.

 

In the garden they search among the plants and crevices for insects (e.g. aphids, beetles, and caterpillars) and spiders, but also take sunflower hearts or high energy seed from bird feeders, or peck at a suet food bar or peanuts.

 

Blue Tits are able to culturally transmit learning to other Tit species. An example of this, dating from the 1920s, is the ability to open milk bottles with foil tops, to get at the cream underneath. Such behaviour has been suppressed recently by the gradual change of human dietary habits (low-fat or skimmed milk instead of full-fat), and the way of getting them (from a supermarket, instead of the milkman).

 

Blue Tits, and other tits, also peck putty around windows, usually at winter time. Some may simply be hungry and attracted to the linseed oil in the putty, though it is thought more likely that they are simply searching for food.

 

The small size of the blue tit makes it vulnerable to prey by larger birds such as Jays who catch the vulnerable fledglings when leaving the nest. The most important predator is probably the sparrowhawk. Nests may be robbed by mammals such as weasels and red squirrels and grey squirrels in the UK.

 

Blue Tits will nest in any hole in a tree, wall or nest box. They are well known for nesting in more unusual places, such as letter boxes, pipes, etc. The nest is a cup made by the female from moss, wool, dead leaves, spiders' webs, and lined with down.

 

The successful breeding of chicks is dependent on sufficient supply of green caterpillars as well as satisfactory weather. Breeding seasons may be affected badly if the weather is cold and wet between May and July, particularly if this coincides with the emergence of the caterpillars on which the nestlings are fed.

 

 

 

Blue Tit