graphic-2

Reddish Vale Country Park

Comma Butterfly

All images, copyright, Stockport Nature.Com

The Comma butterfly is common throughout Britain and can be seen flying in woodland clearings, hedgerows and gardens.

 

They feed on from flowers such as dandelions and thistles. In late summer they often feed on fallen fruit, such as apples.

Comma caterpillars are black with a red band along each side and have a large white patch on the rear part of the back (which camouflages them by giving them the appearance of bird droppings). They also have rows of spines along the back and sides.

 

The species survives the winter in the adult stage, and adults are of two forms. The form that overwinters before reproducing has dark undersides of the wings, whereas the form that develops directly to sexual maturation has lighter colured wing undersides. Both forms can arise from eggs laid by the same female, depending mainly on the photoperiods experienced by the larvae, but also with an influence of host plants, temperature and sex of individuals.

 

 

In the 19th century the British population of Comma's crashed, and by 1920 there were only two sightings. The cause for this decline is unknown, and from about 1930 the population recovered.

Comma butterflies can be seen March to September.

reddish vale country park Reddish Vale Country Park Reddish Vale Country Park reddish vale country park

Click on photos to enlarge

Reddish Vale Country Park Reddish Vale Country Park Reddish Vale Country Park

Reddish Vale Country Park

Comma Butterfly