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Reddish Vale Country Park

Green Veined White

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reddish vale country park

Named for the lines of scales following the veins under the hindwings, and easy to recognise with its wings closed. The upperside resembles that of the small white although the veins are more prominent, especially in summer insects.

 

It is found in meadows, hedgerows and woodland glades but not as often in gardens and parks like its close relatives the Large and Small Whites, for which it is often mistaken. Like other "white" butterflies, the sexes differ. The female has two spots on each forewing, the male only one. The veins on wings of the female are usually more heavily marked. The underside hindwings are pale yellow with the veins highlighted by black scales giving a greenish tint, hence Green-veined White.

 

Recent research has shown that when males mate with a female, they inject methyl salicylate along with their sperm. The smell of this compound repels other males, thus ensuring the first male's paternity of the eggs—a form of chemical mate guarding.

 

Flies April - October in gardens and other open habitats, although in the north and west of the British Isles it is found mainly in areas of damp grassland.

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Reddish Vale Country Park

Green Veined White

Butterfly